Beginner Stock Market Jobs

by Geri Terzo

Beginner stock market jobs can lead into lifelong careers. Finance professionals, however, must often first pay their dues before advancing to more senior roles. Several Wall Street professions begin as assistant or junior-level jobs.

Traders

A trader buys and sells securities, such as stocks, bonds, options and currencies for an intended profit, according to PrincetonReview.com. While a junior or assistant trader should not necessarily expect to participate in decision making on a trade, he may be involved in logistical processes such as transferring trades to the books.

Investment Bankers

An investment banker designs deals for corporations including mergers and acquisitions, initial public offerings and debt offerings. A junior banker uses an opportunity to increase her knowledge of finance and to understand the demands and focus that are required in the banker's role.

Financial Analyst

A financial analyst's primary function is to gather detailed research on corporations and to analyze that information. A junior analyst contributes to research, analysis, summarizing information, and accounting for reports.

Education

Employees with an Ivy League degree or who have earned an MBA may be first in line for promotion. Education can also make a difference in title. A graduate with a bachelor's may be referred to as a junior financial analyst while someone with an MBA might earn the title financial analyst immediately.

Considerations

A Wall Street career can be exciting and lucrative but it can also be risky. Hundreds of thousands of finance jobs in addition to billions of dollars were lost at major investment banks during the economic crisis of 2008 and 2009, according to Bloomberg.

About the Author

Geri Terzo is a business writer with more than 15 years of experience on Wall Street. Throughout her career, she has contributed to the two major cable business networks in segment production and chief-booking capacities and has reported for several major trade publications including "IDD Magazine," "Infrastructure Investor" and MandateWire of the "Financial Times." She works as a journalist who has contributed to The Motley Fool and InvestorPlace. Terzo is a graduate of Campbell University, where she earned a Bachelor of Arts in mass communication.

Photo Credits

  • Image by Flickr.com, courtesy of Michael