Where Can I Find Stock Price History?

by Lee Nichols, studioD

Stock price histories provide insight into future behavior. This information is useful to help you decide what stocks you wish to purchase and which of the stocks currently in your portfolio you want to sell. Many companies sell stock information, but using a free service will conserve your funds, leaving you more to invest.

Your Broker

If you have a full-service brokerage account, your broker can give you information about the history of the stocks in which you have an interest. Your brokerage's website also might provide the information you need.

Individual Company Websites

Many companies provide their own stock's history on their websites. Some companies, such as Apple Inc., provide only the price for the past year, while others, such as Intel, provide the historical data for many years. To find a company's stock information on its own website, look for an investor relations or financial information page.

Free Research

Many websites, including Yahoo Finance, Google, AOL and the Wall Street Journal's Market Watch provide stock price histories. The information provided varies by website. As of the date of publication, Yahoo Finance provides stock histories back to 1970 where applicable, but Google Finance only goes back to 1978. The information contained for each stock also varies, so for a complete picture you might need to visit more than one website.

Phone Applications

Several phone apps are designed to assist you with your stock price research. The cost and features of the applications vary, but they all allow you to perform your research from almost anywhere.


Along with the price history, you should look at the stock's consistency and earnings when determining whether to purchase or keep a stock. View the company's profit and loss statements to determine its cash flow and review its balance sheet. All publicly traded companies must disclose this information. Read news reports about the company and stay alert for any information, good or bad, that could affect the stock's value.

About the Author

Specializing in business and finance, Lee Nichols began writing in 2002. Nichols holds a Bachelor of Arts in Web and Graphic Design and a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the University of Mississippi.