How to Ask for an Equity Salary Adjustment

by Charlotte Johnson, studioD

When you want to make more money in your job, you might consider not merely asking for a promotion. Technically, a promotion is the acquisition of a different position in which you will be given more responsibility or authority. The money that accompanies a promotion may or may not be in line with your expectations. However, if you ask for an "equity salary adjustment," you are requesting that your salary be raised so that is competitive with the salaries of others who are in similar positions. Using tact and research as your tools are key to getting the equity salary adjustment you desire.

Research what others are making in your field. You can easily do this online at a number of websites that offer salary comparisons, or, if you have friends at other companies working in the same field, ask what they make. But before you ask, always ask if it's okay to ask. Salary information is one of those things that the majority of people like to keep private.

Base your request to your employer on your accomplishments. Write down what you've accomplished in the past, as well as how you've consistently benefited the company. Do not base your request on a personal desire or need for more money. That sort of request lacks strength and substance.

Carefully choose your timing. If you know Monday morning is one of the busiest times for your boss, don't ask to see him then. Speak to your boss during a calm moment and ask when a good time would be for you to sit down and discuss some issues.

Write your request for an equity salary adjustment in a concise, clear form and give it to your boss when you meet. Ask her to review it and let you know what she thinks when she has had time to consider your request.

Maintain flexibility. Bringing your salary up to a competitive level could involve other avenues rather than a simple raise in your gross pay. Other perks, such as financial assistance in your education or being able to work from home periodically, can equate with an equity salary adjustment.

Behave professionally if your boss says no. Refrain from anger or sarcasm. Ask what you can do to receive an equity salary adjustment in the future. You may need to improve your performance before your employer is willing to accommodate you.

About the Author

Charlotte Johnson is a musician, teacher and writer with a master's degree in education. She has contributed to a variety of websites, specializing in health, education, the arts, home and garden, animals and parenting.

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